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Restoring Civic Virtue in America

by |December 5th, 2016

As featured in the Boston Globe | December 4, 2016 The direst threat American society faces today is the collapse of civic virtue. By that, I mean the honesty and trust that enables the country to function as a decent, forward-looking, optimistic nation. The defining characteristic of the 2016 Presidential election is that neither candidate… read more

Categories: Uncategorized
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The End of AIDS

by |December 2nd, 2016

As featured in Project Syndicate | November 29, 2016 The AIDS pandemic claimed around 36 million lives between 1981 and 2016, and a similar number around the world currently live with the HIV virus. Some 1.2 million people died of AIDS last year, and another 1.8 million were infected. Those statistics are daunting, but the startling… read more

Categories: Global Health, HIV/AIDS
JOHN E KASHE

Big Innovations Require Big Investment

by |December 2nd, 2016

As featured in the Boston Globe | November 27, 2016 Of all of the purposes of government, one of the most important but often neglected is to mobilize science and technology to solve critical challenges. Modern society depends on highly complex technological systems for our safety and prosperity. Without these advanced technological systems, we’d have… read more

Categories: Uncategorized
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US Must Transition to Low-Carbon Energy

by |November 21st, 2016

As featured in the Boston Globe | November 20, 2016 Tesla electric cars are recharged at a supercharging station in Darien, Conn. Part of a weekly series on the economic choices facing the United States and its relations with the rest of the world. For previous entries, click here. Energy is the lifeblood of the economy…. read more

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South African university crisis needs a change of policy, not just more money

by |October 27th, 2016

As featured in The Conversation | 27 October 2016 South Africa’s finance minister, Pravin Gordhan, has had to juggle two competing sets of demands in approaching the 2016 medium term budget. On the one hand the government’s debt-to-GDP ratio has doubled since the global financial crisis in 2009. Since then, South Africa has also suffered from low economic… read more

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International Day of the Girl

by |October 13th, 2016

By Tara Stafford Ocansey, Radhika Iyengar and Haein Shin, as featured in the Huffington Post |  13 October 2016. Today as we celebrate International Day of the Girl, we know that girls with secondary education are six times less likely to be married as children, and twice as likely to send their children to school. We know a… read more

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Why students should bear some of the burden of hikes

by |October 3rd, 2016

As featured in Business Live | 3 October 2016 The Fees Must Fall campaign of 2015 has placed the financing of higher education at centre stage in the political arena. Students complain that fees have increased at rates higher than consumer price inflation. This has indeed been the case from 2009 to 2015, with the rate… read more

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No Time to Waste: Ending America’s Climate Exceptionalism

by |September 27th, 2016

As featured in Commonweal Magazine | 26 September 2016 Each year, the planet breaks another global-warming record. Each month, we hear more stories of record-breaking droughts, heat waves, floods, fires, and extreme weather events that are supposed to occur only once a generation. And each new study seems to suggest that critical triggers like melting polar ice caps are coming… read more

University Income

The financing of higher education in South Africa

by |September 22nd, 2016

As featured in Econ3x3 | 22 September 2016 Higher-than-inflation increases in student fees since 2009 often are blamed on declining government subsidies to universities. This is not entirely correct, if one considers real per-student subsidies. Fee increases resulted mainly from cost pressures faced by universities due to growing student numbers and a weakening rand. These pressures… read more

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Does the Ghanaian Schooling System Make Children Literate?

by |May 12th, 2016

As featured in the Huffington Post | 12 May 2016 Northern Ghana region is well known for its rural and remote environment. Schools are far apart and access becomes an issue, especially in the rainy season. Despite many attempts from the District Education Officials, teachers don’t prefer to reside in the area. They commute by public… read more

Categories: Education, Ghana